Dhal v Dal

Phonetic Ph*k Up: Dhal V Dal
Phonetic Faux Pas: Dhal V Dal

There seems to be a personality problem with the humble ‘dal’. Dal or ‘daal’, is a Hindi term used for cooked pulses or lentils. Lentils (from legumes) is split and prepared as a stew that goes well with rice or flattened bread, as a staple. There are several variations of the same, as one would travel from region to region (specifically in South Asian countries). Now the problem arises when the ‘dal’ is written and pronounced as ‘dhal’. This is where the personality problem arises.

Bronze copy of Schwantaler's Shield of Hercules at Chatsworth House, UK
Bronze copy of Schwantaler’s Shield of Hercules at Chatsworth House, UK

‘Dhal’, as transcripted from Hindi, means shield. One that is commonly used in warfare. Fancy, engraved and carved ones from history to the ones used by anti-rioting police. So when ‘dhal’ is used, interchangeable for the ‘dal’, it loses its taste; almost literally. Sure some varieties of ‘dal’ are spicy enough to bring an army to its knees as there are others that can win kingdoms.

I feel, if the western world would have termed it as ‘dahl’, it wouldn’t have been much of an issue. Unless Sophie would resist her name becoming a recipe! But when alphabet ‘H’ is conjoined after ‘D’, then phonetically it assumes a heavier broth. The consonant ‘dh’ is a ‘punchy’ one, onomatopoeically speaking, something that is used to denote the base note of the left of the tabla. The other sound is a heavier ‘D’. Native Hindi speakers would understand the usage here. Many languages around the globe, translate heavy sounds into a more fluid phonetics, like the Portuguese are known to do.

Funnily, if ‘H’ is added to the ‘dal’, and kept silent while pronouncing, then I do not see why it is added in the first place! If border-less food ambassadors want to migrate the word for lentils, then use ‘dal’ or at most, ‘daal’.

Phonetically, a ‘dal’ is to be uttered like you would read Dante. You see, the ‘dal’ is no less poetic. It is tough to make a good ‘dal’. It is the simplest thing that I judge most restaurant menus on. It is something that can cement a relationship, if made correctly. On the other hand, the ‘dhal’ is a dull sounding word that takes away from the lustre of this delicious broth.

Therefore, I reject the ‘dhal’ in favour of the ‘dal’. And I would urge the culinary world to see the taste behind the reasoning and favour the seasoning. So, say it with me, ‘dal’.

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6 thoughts on “Dhal v Dal”

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